Crimson Ink
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Marc Quinn, “Self,” 1991. Photo by Selin Alemdar/Contributor/Getty Images
Opinions

Crimson Ink

When Blood and Art Converge
Stach Szabłowski
Reading
time 7 minutes

Art and war. No two spheres are at once more alike and more distant from each other. As Russia was amassing troops near the Ukrainian border, I found myself thinking about an artist who made blood into a work of art.

The history of our species is sometimes described as one great escape from the primordial. According to Silicon Valley tech enthusiasts, we have almost managed to break free. Just one more push, the last stretch—and we will enter the transhumanist era. People in this era will really be a different kettle of fish. These beings’ own mothers won’t recognize them, let alone primitive humans.

Others argue that our escape is a sham. Modern representatives of Homo sapiens think they are racing forward, towards progress—while in reality they are going round in circles, completing tight laps around their own original, primordial essence. It is impossible to run away from oneself. As for me, I am inclined to take a stance somewhere

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A Three-Dimensional Nothing
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Photo by Richard Horvath/Unsplash
Experiences

A Three-Dimensional Nothing

Holograms and Art
Stach Szabłowski

Holography is a dream come true, which artists have fantasized about for centuries. At the turn of the 1960s and 70s, when technological advancements enabled the creation of three-dimensional holographic images, there was the whiff of an artistic revolution, the greatest one since the invention of photography in the 19th century. Yet, the revolution never happened and it leaves one wondering why. 

People carry holograms with them every day. At least, those who use credit cards do—a small holographic image is one of its basic security features. The technology is used for reading barcodes in stores, and there is even a holographic principle, according to which the universe is… one huge hologram. Only an expert in physics could explain the exact details, but the important thing is that supposedly the proposition helps overcome the contradictions between scientific notions about the nature of the universe on a micro and macro scale. In other words, it reconciles the theory of relativity and quantum mechanics, which is no mean feat. If the universe is an enormous hologram, it’s odd they’re so rarely encountered in galleries, and that instead of admiring these unique images in museums, they usually only appear on credit cards.

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