The Evolution of a Leader
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Illustration by Karyna Piwowarska
Opinions

The Evolution of a Leader

The Rise and Fall of Evo Morales
Maciej Wesołowski
Reading
time 5 minutes

Evo Morales was the first Indigenous president of Bolivia. Yet a decade later, support for him is far from certain.

The ancestors of the former president were mostly miners from Altiplano, but he was born to an Aymara family of farmers and moved to the Chapare Province as a young adult. As a child, Evo Morales lived in extreme poverty. Only two out of his six siblings survived and reached adulthood; the others died of hunger. In this region, as late as in the 1990s there was still no electricity and only 2.5% of the population had access to running water and a sewage system. Evo became an activist when he was still a teenager. He built a football team from scratch and started a music band in which he played the trumpet. Like many of

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Weather for Bogotá
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Illustration by Cyryl Lechowicz
Experiences, Fiction

Weather for Bogotá

Colombia’s Super Mayors
Maciej Wesołowski

Can a superman, imaginative cyclist and fearless journalist make a revolution? Yes, but it will be a peaceful revolution. Its victim will be violence; its beneficiary – the capital of Colombia, fortunate to have great mayors.

On Sundays around noon, Bogotá doesn’t look like other big South American cities. In the streets of Colombia’s capital, with its eight-million population, commerce is flourishing. Some people are dancing; some are barbecuing. Older inhabitants are playing chess. The younger ones are betting at guinea pig racings. Yoga lovers are practising on the asphalt roads, right next to aerobics enthusiasts. You can spot some theatre troupes, clowns and jugglers, but mainly the cyclists. There are also skateboarders, scooter riders, runners, and people on wheelchairs, but no cars! This event is called ciclovía: a true celebration of cycling. Each Sunday, between 7am and 2pm, the mayor of Bogotá closes most of the main roads, i.e. nearly 300 kilometres. Sometimes, there are altogether 1.7 million eco-friendly single-track vehicles on the roads at the same time. This is a world record – nowhere else is the Critical Mass bike ride so popular.

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